The B-Side: Training in a Time of No Ultimate [Ep. 4]

The B-Side is Breakside Strength & Conditioning’s podcast about training, performance, and nutrition in ultimate frisbee.

Charlie Eisenhood and Patrick Kelsey talk about how to get back to training, even though there’s no competitive ultimate happening in the near future, including thoughts on the safe way to return to the gym, how to mix things up, and how to think about training as a lifelong endeavor.

You can also find the The B-Side podcast on iTunes, SpotifyStitcher, Spreaker, iHeartRadio, DeezerRSSGoogle Play, and your other favorite podcasting apps.

How to Safely Return to Training in the Gym or on the Field

The coronavirus pandemic has kept us away from the gym for almost three months. Many of us have also had our seasons truncated or outright cancelled. With an extended period of detraining behind us and a potentially long training timeline in front of us, there are many questions about how to best return to the gym both effectively and safely.

Below, we address how to safely return to the gym — or playing ultimate, for those able to do so! Continue reading “How to Safely Return to Training in the Gym or on the Field”

The B-Side: Training at Home, Stretching & Foam Rolling [Ep. 3]

The B-Side is Breakside Strength & Conditioning’s podcast about training, performance, and nutrition in ultimate frisbee.

Breakside coaches Charlie Eisenhood and Patrick Kelsey talk about training at home — the challenges and silver linings, the best exercises, and more. Later in the show, they talk about some of the basics around static stretching, dynamic stretching, and foam rolling (24:05).

You can also find the The B-Side podcast on iTunes, SpotifyStitcher, Spreaker, iHeartRadio, DeezerRSSGoogle Play, and your other favorite podcasting apps.

The B-Side: Shifting Phases, Building A Gym Bag [Ep. 2]

The B-Side is Breakside Strength & Conditioning’s podcast about training, performance, and nutrition in ultimate frisbee.

PK and Charlie discuss how to shift out of the deep strength-focused winter training into more power and speed work to get ready for tryouts (or, for college players, the season). Later in the show, they share some ideas for building out a useful gym bag or simple home gym. (13:24)

You can also find the The B-Side podcast on iTunes, SpotifyStitcher, Spreaker, iHeartRadio, DeezerRSSGoogle Play, and your other favorite podcasting apps.

The Right Way To Warm Up Before Games

Warmups. Some players hate them, most – at best – tolerate them, and many teams do them suboptimally, if not outright incorrectly.

If you’ve been playing for a few years and have been on multiple teams, you’ve undoubtedly noticed that variability between warmup protocols across (and even within) teams is enormous. What explains this variety? As a sport, shouldn’t we have nailed down exactly which are the best activities to perform before playing? Who’s in charge here?

Perhaps warmups are inherently frustrating because they are so misunderstood and misapplied. This article is here to shed some light on the topic and provide a framework for priority, order of operations, and desired result. Continue reading “The Right Way To Warm Up Before Games”

The 3 Planes of Movement and Why They Matter

The first several chapters of any training certification textbook are filled with rather basic (baseline) science. Lever types, muscle anatomy, and cellular biology all receive an overview, seemingly just to check off boxes that the certifying agency has deemed necessary. It’s commonly acknowledged among coaches is that while this knowledge is certainly necessary, it isn’t always front-of-mind when coaching. Strength and conditioning coach Martin Rooney routinely jokes at coaching seminars “who remembers the Krebs cycle?” A question which almost always receives a combination groan/laugh from coaches he’s addressing (some nervously hiding the fact that they’ve forgotten entirely what the Krebs cycle is). The frequency with which this knowledge is referenced, doesn’t make it any less important, but the gap between the foundational necessity and the applied usefulness of this information is not. One of the core concepts that is typically contained in this chapter is “planes of movement”. This concept is typically illustrated by a drawing of a faceless outline of a person who is bisected by 3 planes. It’s a simple enough image that almost anyone would gloss over the adjoining paragraph thinking “ok I get that, let’s get to the real stuff”. However, these planes are a great framework for designing workouts, cueing movements and improving agility.

Only Available to Breakside Subscribers

Get access to the rest of this blog post and all the quality, in-depth fitness content at Breakside Strength & Conditioning with a subscription! No ads, no tiers, no hidden fees - just a smart, all-in-one training solution.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? Login